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India-Bangladesh third ODI abandoned due to rain

 The third ODI between Bangladesh and India has been abandoned due to rain after an Indian batting collapse on Thursday.

EC wants end to lottery system

Allow none on wrong lane: Quader

Writ challenging legality of MPs without contest dismissed

Bangladesh-born American is Rahatul Ashikim Khan, who allegedly wanted to join al-Shabab, a Somalia-based terror group linked to al Qaeda, federal agents say

Two men, including a Bangladesh-born US citizen, have been arrested in Texas on terror charges.

They planned to travel halfway around the world to engage in violent jihad, federal agents said, abcnews reported on Wednesday.

Bangladesh-born American is Rahatul Ashikim Khan, who allegedly wanted to join al-Shabab, a Somalia-based terror group linked to al Qaeda. Another is Michael Todd Wolfe from Houston, learning to fight in Syria was allegedly the goal.

According to charging documents, Wolfe’s wife met an undercover FBI agent in August 2013 and told the agent she and her husband wanted to “perform a violent form of jihad” outside of the United States.

She said Wolfe “just wants to hop into Syria. He’s just ready to die for his deen [religion]. He’s ready to die for someone, for something,” court documents say.

Over several months, another undercover FBI agent met with Wolfe, and they discussed Wolfe’s plans for going overseas, according to the court documents.

On January 22, both undercover FBI agents met with Wolfe and his wife, and Wolfe “indicated that he had learned that al Qaeda in Syria was training brothers from other countries (foreign fighters) and then sending those fighters back from Syria to their home countries to conduct terror attacks,” the FBI says in court documents.

A month later, one of the FBI agents allegedly watched a YouTube video about foreign fighters in Syria with Wolfe and his wife.

They were planning to use some of their estimated $5,000 tax refund to pay for their travel, prosecutors say.

In subsequent meetings with undercover agents, Wolfe allegedly expressed dismay over infighting among terrorist groups in Syria, and he “struggled” with whether to actually go.

Then Tuesday, Wolfe and his family went to George Bush International Airport, attempting to board a flight to Toronto and then make their way to Syria.

Instead, Wolfe was arrested, accused of attempting to provide “material support and resources to terrorists, including but not limited to personnel, including himself.”

Khan became a US citizen in 2002 and is a full-time student at University of Texas-Austin, which is now on summer recess.

According to charging documents in his case, in early 2011, Khan began communicating with an informant in an online chat room, which he used “as a platform to spot and assess potential recruits for committing violent jihad overseas.”

Khan introduced the informant to an unidentified co-conspirator, possibly in Florida, who then attempted to recruit the informant to travel to Somalia to engage in jihad there, prosecutors say in court documents.

The co-conspirator then introduced the informant to another person, also likely in Florida, who discussed how Khan could get to Somalia to join the terrorist group al-Shabab.

In June 2011, Khan told the informant that his brain “starts bleeding” when he sees weak “bengalis” who have “no love for jihad” and “no love to shed blood,” authorities allege.

The arrests come a month after the Justice Department asked a special prosecutor in its National Security Division to help lead US efforts aimed at stemming the flow of American fighters to the civil war in Syria.

Top law enforcement officials have said they’re concerned the young men and women could possibly return home, freshly trained in deadly operations, and unleash havoc on the homeland.

– See more at: http://www.dhakatribune.com/bangladesh/2014/jun/19/bangladesh-born-american-arrested-terror-charges#sthash.NNW1IeQc.dpuf

Bangladesh-born American is Rahatul Ashikim Khan, who allegedly wanted to join al-Shabab, a Somalia-based terror group linked to al Qaeda, federal agents say

Two men, including a Bangladesh-born US citizen, have been arrested in Texas on terror charges.

They planned to travel halfway around the world to engage in violent jihad, federal agents said, abcnews reported on Wednesday.

Bangladesh-born American is Rahatul Ashikim Khan, who allegedly wanted to join al-Shabab, a Somalia-based terror group linked to al Qaeda. Another is Michael Todd Wolfe from Houston, learning to fight in Syria was allegedly the goal.

According to charging documents, Wolfe’s wife met an undercover FBI agent in August 2013 and told the agent she and her husband wanted to “perform a violent form of jihad” outside of the United States.

She said Wolfe “just wants to hop into Syria. He’s just ready to die for his deen [religion]. He’s ready to die for someone, for something,” court documents say.

Over several months, another undercover FBI agent met with Wolfe, and they discussed Wolfe’s plans for going overseas, according to the court documents.

On January 22, both undercover FBI agents met with Wolfe and his wife, and Wolfe “indicated that he had learned that al Qaeda in Syria was training brothers from other countries (foreign fighters) and then sending those fighters back from Syria to their home countries to conduct terror attacks,” the FBI says in court documents.

A month later, one of the FBI agents allegedly watched a YouTube video about foreign fighters in Syria with Wolfe and his wife.

They were planning to use some of their estimated $5,000 tax refund to pay for their travel, prosecutors say.

In subsequent meetings with undercover agents, Wolfe allegedly expressed dismay over infighting among terrorist groups in Syria, and he “struggled” with whether to actually go.

Then Tuesday, Wolfe and his family went to George Bush International Airport, attempting to board a flight to Toronto and then make their way to Syria.

Instead, Wolfe was arrested, accused of attempting to provide “material support and resources to terrorists, including but not limited to personnel, including himself.”

Khan became a US citizen in 2002 and is a full-time student at University of Texas-Austin, which is now on summer recess.

According to charging documents in his case, in early 2011, Khan began communicating with an informant in an online chat room, which he used “as a platform to spot and assess potential recruits for committing violent jihad overseas.”

Khan introduced the informant to an unidentified co-conspirator, possibly in Florida, who then attempted to recruit the informant to travel to Somalia to engage in jihad there, prosecutors say in court documents.

The co-conspirator then introduced the informant to another person, also likely in Florida, who discussed how Khan could get to Somalia to join the terrorist group al-Shabab.

In June 2011, Khan told the informant that his brain “starts bleeding” when he sees weak “bengalis” who have “no love for jihad” and “no love to shed blood,” authorities allege.

The arrests come a month after the Justice Department asked a special prosecutor in its National Security Division to help lead US efforts aimed at stemming the flow of American fighters to the civil war in Syria.

Top law enforcement officials have said they’re concerned the young men and women could possibly return home, freshly trained in deadly operations, and unleash havoc on the homeland.

– See more at: http://www.dhakatribune.com/bangladesh/2014/jun/19/bangladesh-born-american-arrested-terror-charges#sthash.NNW1IeQc.dpuf

Bangladesh-born American is Rahatul Ashikim Khan, who allegedly wanted to join al-Shabab, a Somalia-based terror group linked to al Qaeda, federal agents say

Two men, including a Bangladesh-born US citizen, have been arrested in Texas on terror charges.

They planned to travel halfway around the world to engage in violent jihad, federal agents said, abcnews reported on Wednesday.

Bangladesh-born American is Rahatul Ashikim Khan, who allegedly wanted to join al-Shabab, a Somalia-based terror group linked to al Qaeda. Another is Michael Todd Wolfe from Houston, learning to fight in Syria was allegedly the goal.

According to charging documents, Wolfe’s wife met an undercover FBI agent in August 2013 and told the agent she and her husband wanted to “perform a violent form of jihad” outside of the United States.

She said Wolfe “just wants to hop into Syria. He’s just ready to die for his deen [religion]. He’s ready to die for someone, for something,” court documents say.

Over several months, another undercover FBI agent met with Wolfe, and they discussed Wolfe’s plans for going overseas, according to the court documents.

On January 22, both undercover FBI agents met with Wolfe and his wife, and Wolfe “indicated that he had learned that al Qaeda in Syria was training brothers from other countries (foreign fighters) and then sending those fighters back from Syria to their home countries to conduct terror attacks,” the FBI says in court documents.

A month later, one of the FBI agents allegedly watched a YouTube video about foreign fighters in Syria with Wolfe and his wife.

They were planning to use some of their estimated $5,000 tax refund to pay for their travel, prosecutors say.

In subsequent meetings with undercover agents, Wolfe allegedly expressed dismay over infighting among terrorist groups in Syria, and he “struggled” with whether to actually go.

Then Tuesday, Wolfe and his family went to George Bush International Airport, attempting to board a flight to Toronto and then make their way to Syria.

Instead, Wolfe was arrested, accused of attempting to provide “material support and resources to terrorists, including but not limited to personnel, including himself.”

Khan became a US citizen in 2002 and is a full-time student at University of Texas-Austin, which is now on summer recess.

According to charging documents in his case, in early 2011, Khan began communicating with an informant in an online chat room, which he used “as a platform to spot and assess potential recruits for committing violent jihad overseas.”

Khan introduced the informant to an unidentified co-conspirator, possibly in Florida, who then attempted to recruit the informant to travel to Somalia to engage in jihad there, prosecutors say in court documents.

The co-conspirator then introduced the informant to another person, also likely in Florida, who discussed how Khan could get to Somalia to join the terrorist group al-Shabab.

In June 2011, Khan told the informant that his brain “starts bleeding” when he sees weak “bengalis” who have “no love for jihad” and “no love to shed blood,” authorities allege.

The arrests come a month after the Justice Department asked a special prosecutor in its National Security Division to help lead US efforts aimed at stemming the flow of American fighters to the civil war in Syria.

Top law enforcement officials have said they’re concerned the young men and women could possibly return home, freshly trained in deadly operations, and unleash havoc on the homeland.

– See more at: http://www.dhakatribune.com/bangladesh/2014/jun/19/bangladesh-born-american-arrested-terror-charges#sthash.NNW1IeQc.dpuf

FKFKBangladesh-born American is Rahatul Ashikim Khan, who allegedly wanted to join al-Shabab, a Somalia-based terror group linked to al Qaeda, federal agents say

Two men, including a Bangladesh-born US citizen, have been arrested in Texas on terror charges.

They planned to travel halfway around the world to engage in violent jihad, federal agents said, abcnews reported on Wednesday.

Bangladesh-born American is Rahatul Ashikim Khan, who allegedly wanted to join al-Shabab, a Somalia-based terror group linked to al Qaeda. Another is Michael Todd Wolfe from Houston, learning to fight in Syria was allegedly the goal.

According to charging documents, Wolfe’s wife met an undercover FBI agent in August 2013 and told the agent she and her husband wanted to “perform a violent form of jihad” outside of the United States.

She said Wolfe “just wants to hop into Syria. He’s just ready to die for his deen [religion]. He’s ready to die for someone, for something,” court documents say.

Over several months, another undercover FBI agent met with Wolfe, and they discussed Wolfe’s plans for going overseas, according to the court documents.

On January 22, both undercover FBI agents met with Wolfe and his wife, and Wolfe “indicated that he had learned that al Qaeda in Syria was training brothers from other countries (foreign fighters) and then sending those fighters back from Syria to their home countries to conduct terror attacks,” the FBI says in court documents.

A month later, one of the FBI agents allegedly watched a YouTube video about foreign fighters in Syria with Wolfe and his wife.

They were planning to use some of their estimated $5,000 tax refund to pay for their travel, prosecutors say.

In subsequent meetings with undercover agents, Wolfe allegedly expressed dismay over infighting among terrorist groups in Syria, and he “struggled” with whether to actually go.

Then Tuesday, Wolfe and his family went to George Bush International Airport, attempting to board a flight to Toronto and then make their way to Syria.

Instead, Wolfe was arrested, accused of attempting to provide “material support and resources to terrorists, including but not limited to personnel, including himself.”

Khan became a US citizen in 2002 and is a full-time student at University of Texas-Austin, which is now on summer recess.

According to charging documents in his case, in early 2011, Khan began communicating with an informant in an online chat room, which he used “as a platform to spot and assess potential recruits for committing violent jihad overseas.”

Khan introduced the informant to an unidentified co-conspirator, possibly in Florida, who then attempted to recruit the informant to travel to Somalia to engage in jihad there, prosecutors say in court documents.

The co-conspirator then introduced the informant to another person, also likely in Florida, who discussed how Khan could get to Somalia to join the terrorist group al-Shabab.

In June 2011, Khan told the informant that his brain “starts bleeding” when he sees weak “bengalis” who have “no love for jihad” and “no love to shed blood,” authorities allege.

The arrests come a month after the Justice Department asked a special prosecutor in its National Security Division to help lead US efforts aimed at stemming the flow of American fighters to the civil war in Syria.

Top law enforcement officials have said they’re concerned the young men and women could possibly return home, freshly trained in deadly operations, and unleash havoc on the homeland.

– See more at: http://www.dhakatribune.com/bangladesh/2014/jun/19/bangladesh-born-american-arrested-terror-charges#sthash.NNW1IeQc.dpuf

‘Bangladesh has bright prospects’

1

the goal.

According to charging documents, Wolfe’s wife met an undercover FBI agent in August 2013 and told the agent she and her husband wanted to “p

– See more at: http://www.dhakatribune.com/bangladesh/2014/jun/19/bangladesh-born-american-arrested-terror-charges#sthash.NNW1IeQc.dpuf

Bangladesh-born American is Rahatul Ashikim Khan, who allegedly wanted to join al-Shabab, a Somalia-based terror group linked to al Qaeda, federal agents say

Two men, including a Bangladesh-born US citizen, have been arrested in Texas on terror charges.

They planned to travel halfway around the world to engage in violent jihad, federal agents said, abcnews reported on Wednesday.

Bangladesh-born American is Rahatul Ashikim Khan, who allegedly wanted to join al-Shabab, a Somalia-based terror group linked to al Qaeda. Another is Michael Todd Wolfe from Houston, learning to fight in Syria was allegedly the goal.

According to charging documents, Wolfe’s wife met an undercover FBI agent in August 2013 and told the agent she and her husband wanted to “perform a violent form of jihad” outside of the United States.

She said Wolfe “just wants to hop into Syria. He’s just ready to die for his deen [religion]. He’s ready to die for someone, for something,” court documents say.

Over several months, another undercover FBI agent met with Wolfe, and they discussed Wolfe’s plans for going overseas, according to the court documents.

On January 22, both undercover FBI agents met with Wolfe and his wife, and Wolfe “indicated that he had learned that al Qaeda in Syria was training brothers from other countries (foreign fighters) and then sending those fighters back from Syria to their home countries to conduct terror attacks,” the FBI says in court documents.

A month later, one of the FBI agents allegedly watched a YouTube video about foreign fighters in Syria with Wolfe and his wife.

They were planning to use some of their estimated $5,000 tax refund to pay for their travel, prosecutors say.

In subsequent meetings with undercover agents, Wolfe allegedly expressed dismay over infighting among terrorist groups in Syria, and he “struggled” with whether to actually go.

Then Tuesday, Wolfe and his family went to George Bush International Airport, attempting to board a flight to Toronto and then make their way to Syria.

Instead, Wolfe was arrested, accused of attempting to provide “material support and resources to terrorists, including but not limited to personnel, including himself.”

Khan became a US citizen in 2002 and is a full-time student at University of Texas-Austin, which is now on summer recess.

According to charging documents in his case, in early 2011, Khan began communicating with an informant in an online chat room, which he used “as a platform to spot and assess potential recruits for committing violent jihad overseas.”

Khan introduced the informant to an unidentified co-conspirator, possibly in Florida, who then attempted to recruit the informant to travel to Somalia to engage in jihad there, prosecutors say in court documents.

The co-conspirator then introduced the informant to another person, also likely in Florida, who discussed how Khan could get to Somalia to join the terrorist group al-Shabab.

In June 2011, Khan told the informant that his brain “starts bleeding” when he sees weak “bengalis” who have “no love for jihad” and “no love to shed blood,” authorities allege.

The arrests come a month after the Justice Department asked a special prosecutor in its National Security Division to help lead US efforts aimed at stemming the flow of American fighters to the civil war in Syria.

Top law enforcement officials have said they’re concerned the young men and women could possibly return home, freshly trained in deadly operations, and unleash havoc on the homeland.

– See more at: http://www.dhakatribune.com/bangladesh/2014/jun/19/bangladesh-born-american-arrested-terror-charges#sthash.NNW1IeQc.dpuf

Bangladesh-born American is Rahatul Ashikim Khan, who allegedly wanted to join al-Shabab, a Somalia-based terror group linked to al Qaeda, federal agents say

Two men, including a Bangladesh-born US citizen, have been arrested in Texas on terror charges.

They planned to travel halfway around the world to engage in violent jihad, federal agents said, abcnews reported on Wednesday.

Bangladesh-born American is Rahatul Ashikim Khan, who allegedly wanted to join al-Shabab, a Somalia-based terror group linked to al Qaeda. Another is Michael Todd Wolfe from Houston, learning to fight in Syria was allegedly the goal.

According to charging documents, Wolfe’s wife met an undercover FBI agent in August 2013 and told the agent she and her husband wanted to “perform a violent form of jihad” outside of the United States.

She said Wolfe “just wants to hop into Syria. He’s just ready to die for his deen [religion]. He’s ready to die for someone, for something,” court documents say.

Over several months, another undercover FBI agent met with Wolfe, and they discussed Wolfe’s plans for going overseas, according to the court documents.

On January 22, both undercover FBI agents met with Wolfe and his wife, and Wolfe “indicated that he had learned that al Qaeda in Syria was training brothers from other countries (foreign fighters) and then sending those fighters back from Syria to their home countries to conduct terror attacks,” the FBI says in court documents.

A month later, one of the FBI agents allegedly watched a YouTube video about foreign fighters in Syria with Wolfe and his wife.

They were planning to use some of their estimated $5,000 tax refund to pay for their travel, prosecutors say.

In subsequent meetings with undercover agents, Wolfe allegedly expressed dismay over infighting among terrorist groups in Syria, and he “struggled” with whether to actually go.

Then Tuesday, Wolfe and his family went to George Bush International Airport, attempting to board a flight to Toronto and then make their way to Syria.

Instead, Wolfe was arrested, accused of attempting to provide “material support and resources to terrorists, including but not limited to personnel, including himself.”

Khan became a US citizen in 2002 and is a full-time student at University of Texas-Austin, which is now on summer recess.

According to charging documents in his case, in early 2011, Khan began communicating with an informant in an online chat room, which he used “as a platform to spot and assess potential recruits for committing violent jihad overseas.”

Khan introduced the informant to an unidentified co-conspirator, possibly in Florida, who then attempted to recruit the informant to travel to Somalia to engage in jihad there, prosecutors say in court documents.

The co-conspirator then introduced the informant to another person, also likely in Florida, who discussed how Khan could get to Somalia to join the terrorist group al-Shabab.

In June 2011, Khan told the informant that his brain “starts bleeding” when he sees weak “bengalis” who have “no love for jihad” and “no love to shed blood,” authorities allege.

The arrests come a month after the Justice Department asked a special prosecutor in its National Security Division to help lead US efforts aimed at stemming the flow of American fighters to the civil war in Syria.

Top law enforcement officials have said they’re concerned the young men and women could possibly return home, freshly trained in deadly operations, and unleash havoc on the homeland.

– See more at: http://www.dhakatribune.com/bangladesh/2014/jun/19/bangladesh-born-american-arrested-terror-charges#sthash.NNW1IeQc.dpuf

Bangladesh-born American is Rahatul Ashikim Khan, who allegedly wanted to join al-Shabab, a Somalia-based terror group linked to al Qaeda, federal agents say

Two men, including a Bangladesh-born US citizen, have been arrested in Texas on terror charges.

They planned to travel halfway around the world to engage in violent jihad, federal agents said, abcnews reported on Wednesday.

Bangladesh-born American is Rahatul Ashikim Khan, who allegedly wanted to join al-Shabab, a Somalia-based terror group linked to al Qaeda. Another is Michael Todd Wolfe from Houston, learning to fight in Syria was allegedly the goal.

According to charging documents, Wolfe’s wife met an undercover FBI agent in August 2013 and told the agent she and her husband wanted to “perform a violent form of jihad” outside of the United States.

She said Wolfe “just wants to hop into Syria. He’s just ready to die for his deen [religion]. He’s ready to die for someone, for something,” court documents say.

Over several months, another undercover FBI agent met with Wolfe, and they discussed Wolfe’s plans for going overseas, according to the court documents.

On January 22, both undercover FBI agents met with Wolfe and his wife, and Wolfe “indicated that he had learned that al Qaeda in Syria was training brothers from other countries (foreign fighters) and then sending those fighters back from Syria to their home countries to conduct terror attacks,” the FBI says in court documents.

A month later, one of the FBI agents allegedly watched a YouTube video about foreign fighters in Syria with Wolfe and his wife.

They were planning to use some of their estimated $5,000 tax refund to pay for their travel, prosecutors say.

In subsequent meetings with undercover agents, Wolfe allegedly expressed dismay over infighting among terrorist groups in Syria, and he “struggled” with whether to actually go.

Then Tuesday, Wolfe and his family went to George Bush International Airport, attempting to board a flight to Toronto and then make their way to Syria.

Instead, Wolfe was arrested, accused of attempting to provide “material support and resources to terrorists, including but not limited to personnel, including himself.”

Khan became a US citizen in 2002 and is a full-time student at University of Texas-Austin, which is now on summer recess.

According to charging documents in his case, in early 2011, Khan began communicating with an informant in an online chat room, which he used “as a platform to spot and assess potential recruits for committing violent jihad overseas.”

Khan introduced the informant to an unidentified co-conspirator, possibly in Florida, who then attempted to recruit the informant to travel to Somalia to engage in jihad there, prosecutors say in court documents.

The co-conspirator then introduced the informant to another person, also likely in Florida, who discussed how Khan could get to Somalia to join the terrorist group al-Shabab.

In June 2011, Khan told the informant that his brain “starts bleeding” when he sees weak “bengalis” who have “no love for jihad” and “no love to shed blood,” authorities allege.

The arrests come a month after the Justice Department asked a special prosecutor in its National Security Division to help lead US efforts aimed at stemming the flow of American fighters to the civil war in Syria.

Top law enforcement officials have said they’re concerned the young men and women could possibly return home, freshly trained in deadly operations, and unleash havoc on the homeland.

– See more at: http://www.dhakatribune.com/bangladesh/2014/jun/19/bangladesh-born-american-arrested-terror-charges#sthash.NNW1IeQc.dpuf

Bangladesh-born American is Rahatul Ashikim Khan, who allegedly wanted to join al-Shabab, a Somalia-based terror group linked to al Qaeda, federal agents say

Two men, including a Bangladesh-born US citizen, have been arrested in Texas on terror charges.

They planned to travel halfway around the world to engage in violent jihad, federal agents said, abcnews reported on Wednesday.

Bangladesh-born American is Rahatul Ashikim Khan, who allegedly wanted to join al-Shabab, a Somalia-based terror group linked to al Qaeda. Another is Michael Todd Wolfe from Houston, learning to fight in Syria was allegedly the goal.

According to charging documents, Wolfe’s wife met an undercover FBI agent in August 2013 and told the agent she and her husband wanted to “perform a violent form of jihad” outside of the United States.

She said Wolfe “just wants to hop into Syria. He’s just ready to die for his deen [religion]. He’s ready to die for someone, for something,” court documents say.

Over several months, another undercover FBI agent met with Wolfe, and they discussed Wolfe’s plans for going overseas, according to the court documents.

On January 22, both undercover FBI agents met with Wolfe and his wife, and Wolfe “indicated that he had learned that al Qaeda in Syria was training brothers from other countries (foreign fighters) and then sending those fighters back from Syria to their home countries to conduct terror attacks,” the FBI says in court documents.

A month later, one of the FBI agents allegedly watched a YouTube video about foreign fighters in Syria with Wolfe and his wife.

They were planning to use some of their estimated $5,000 tax refund to pay for their travel, prosecutors say.

In subsequent meetings with undercover agents, Wolfe allegedly expressed dismay over infighting among terrorist groups in Syria, and he “struggled” with whether to actually go.

Then Tuesday, Wolfe and his family went to George Bush International Airport, attempting to board a flight to Toronto and then make their way to Syria.

Instead, Wolfe was arrested, accused of attempting to provide “material support and resources to terrorists, including but not limited to personnel, including himself.”

Khan became a US citizen in 2002 and is a full-time student at University of Texas-Austin, which is now on summer recess.

According to charging documents in his case, in early 2011, Khan began communicating with an informant in an online chat room, which he used “as a platform to spot and assess potential recruits for committing violent jihad overseas.”

Khan introduced the informant to an unidentified co-conspirator, possibly in Florida, who then attempted to recruit the informant to travel to Somalia to engage in jihad there, prosecutors say in court documents.

The co-conspirator then introduced the informant to another person, also likely in Florida, who discussed how Khan could get to Somalia to join the terrorist group al-Shabab.

In June 2011, Khan told the informant that his brain “starts bleeding” when he sees weak “bengalis” who have “no love for jihad” and “no love to shed blood,” authorities allege.

The arrests come a month after the Justice Department asked a special prosecutor in its National Security Division to help lead US efforts aimed at stemming the flow of American fighters to the civil war in Syria.

Top law enforcement officials have said they’re concerned the young men and women could possibly return home, freshly trained in deadly operations, and unleash havoc on the homeland.

– See more at: http://www.dhakatribune.com/bangladesh/2014/jun/19/bangladesh-born-american-arrested-terror-charges#sthash.NNW1IeQc.dpuf

Bangladesh-born American is Rahatul Ashikim Khan, who allegedly wanted to join al-Shabab, a Somalia-based terror group linked to al Qaeda, federal agents say

Two men, including a Bangladesh-born US citizen, have been arrested in Texas on terror charges.

They planned to travel halfway around the world to engage in violent jihad, federal agents said, abcnews reported on Wednesday.

Bangladesh-born American is Rahatul Ashikim Khan, who allegedly wanted to join al-Shabab, a Somalia-based terror group linked to al Qaeda. Another is Michael Todd Wolfe from Houston, learning to fight in Syria was allegedly the goal.

According to charging documents, Wolfe’s wife met an undercover FBI agent in August 2013 and told the agent she and her husband wanted to “perform a violent form of jihad” outside of the United States.

She said Wolfe “just wants to hop into Syria. He’s just ready to die for his deen [religion]. He’s ready to die for someone, for something,” court documents say.

Over several months, another undercover FBI agent met with Wolfe, and they discussed Wolfe’s plans for going overseas, according to the court documents.

On January 22, both undercover FBI agents met with Wolfe and his wife, and Wolfe “indicated that he had learned that al Qaeda in Syria was training brothers from other countries (foreign fighters) and then sending those fighters back from Syria to their home countries to conduct terror attacks,” the FBI says in court documents.

A month later, one of the FBI agents allegedly watched a YouTube video about foreign fighters in Syria with Wolfe and his wife.

They were planning to use some of their estimated $5,000 tax refund to pay for their travel, prosecutors say.

In subsequent meetings with undercover agents, Wolfe allegedly expressed dismay over infighting among terrorist groups in Syria, and he “struggled” with whether to actually go.

Then Tuesday, Wolfe and his family went to George Bush International Airport, attempting to board a flight to Toronto and then make their way to Syria.

Instead, Wolfe was arrested, accused of attempting to provide “material support and resources to terrorists, including but not limited to personnel, including himself.”

Khan became a US citizen in 2002 and is a full-time student at University of Texas-Austin, which is now on summer recess.

According to charging documents in his case, in early 2011, Khan began communicating with an informant in an online chat room, which he used “as a platform to spot and assess potential recruits for committing violent jihad overseas.”

Khan introduced the informant to an unidentified co-conspirator, possibly in Florida, who then attempted to recruit the informant to travel to Somalia to engage in jihad there, prosecutors say in court documents.

The co-conspirator then introduced the informant to another person, also likely in Florida, who discussed how Khan could get to Somalia to join the terrorist group al-Shabab.

In June 2011, Khan told the informant that his brain “starts bleeding” when he sees weak “bengalis” who have “no love for jihad” and “no love to shed blood,” authorities allege.

The arrests come a month after the Justice Department asked a special prosecutor in its National Security Division to help lead US efforts aimed at stemming the flow of American fighters to the civil war in Syria.

Top law enforcement officials have said they’re concerned the young men and women could possibly return home, freshly trained in deadly operations, and unleash havoc on the homeland.

– See more at: http://www.dhakatribune.com/bangladesh/2014/jun/19/bangladesh-born-american-arrested-terror-charges#sthash.NNW1IeQc.dpuf

Bangladesh-born American is Rahatul Ashikim Khan, who allegedly wanted to join al-Shabab, a Somalia-based terror group linked to al Qaeda, federal agents say

Two men, including a Bangladesh-born US citizen, have been arrested in Texas on terror charges.

They planned to travel halfway around the world to engage in violent jihad, federal agents said, abcnews reported on Wednesday.

Bangladesh-born American is Rahatul Ashikim Khan, who allegedly wanted to join al-Shabab, a Somalia-based terror group linked to al Qaeda. Another is Michael Todd Wolfe from Houston, learning to fight in Syria was allegedly the goal.

According to charging documents, Wolfe’s wife met an undercover FBI agent in August 2013 and told the agent she and her husband wanted to “perform a violent form of jihad” outside of the United States.

She said Wolfe “just wants to hop into Syria. He’s just ready to die for his deen [religion]. He’s ready to die for someone, for something,” court documents say.

Over several months, another undercover FBI agent met with Wolfe, and they discussed Wolfe’s plans for going overseas, according to the court documents.

On January 22, both undercover FBI agents met with Wolfe and his wife, and Wolfe “indicated that he had learned that al Qaeda in Syria was training brothers from other countries (foreign fighters) and then sending those fighters back from Syria to their home countries to conduct terror attacks,” the FBI says in court documents.

A month later, one of the FBI agents allegedly watched a YouTube video about foreign fighters in Syria with Wolfe and his wife.

They were planning to use some of their estimated $5,000 tax refund to pay for their travel, prosecutors say.

In subsequent meetings with undercover agents, Wolfe allegedly expressed dismay over infighting among terrorist groups in Syria, and he “struggled” with whether to actually go.

Then Tuesday, Wolfe and his family went to George Bush International Airport, attempting to board a flight to Toronto and then make their way to Syria.

Instead, Wolfe was arrested, accused of attempting to provide “material support and resources to terrorists, including but not limited to personnel, including himself.”

Khan became a US citizen in 2002 and is a full-time student at University of Texas-Austin, which is now on summer recess.

According to charging documents in his case, in early 2011, Khan began communicating with an informant in an online chat room, which he used “as a platform to spot and assess potential recruits for committing violent jihad overseas.”

Khan introduced the informant to an unidentified co-conspirator, possibly in Florida, who then attempted to recruit the informant to travel to Somalia to engage in jihad there, prosecutors say in court documents.

The co-conspirator then introduced the informant to another person, also likely in Florida, who discussed how Khan could get to Somalia to join the terrorist group al-Shabab.

In June 2011, Khan told the informant that his brain “starts bleeding” when he sees weak “bengalis” who have “no love for jihad” and “no love to shed blood,” authorities allege.

The arrests come a month after the Justice Department asked a special prosecutor in its National Security Division to help lead US efforts aimed at stemming the flow of American fighters to the civil war in Syria.

Top law enforcement officials have said they’re concerned the young men and women could possibly return home, freshly trained in deadly operations, and unleash havoc on the homeland.

– See more at: http://www.dhakatribune.com/bangladesh/2014/jun/19/bangladesh-born-american-arrested-terror-charges#sthash.NNW1IeQc.dpuf

Bangladesh-born American is Rahatul Ashikim Khan, who allegedly wanted to join al-Shabab, a Somalia-based terror group linked to al Qaeda, federal agents say

Two men, including a Bangladesh-born US citizen, have been arrested in Texas on terror charges.

They planned to travel halfway around the world to engage in violent jihad, federal agents said, abcnews reported on Wednesday.

Bangladesh-born American is Rahatul Ashikim Khan, who allegedly wanted to join al-Shabab, a Somalia-based terror group linked to al Qaeda. Another is Michael Todd Wolfe from Houston, learning to fight in Syria was allegedly the goal.

According to charging documents, Wolfe’s wife met an undercover FBI agent in August 2013 and told the agent she and her husband wanted to “perform a violent form of jihad” outside of the United States.

She said Wolfe “just wants to hop into Syria. He’s just ready to die for his deen [religion]. He’s ready to die for someone, for something,” court documents say.

Over several months, another undercover FBI agent met with Wolfe, and they discussed Wolfe’s plans for going overseas, according to the court documents.

On January 22, both undercover FBI agents met with Wolfe and his wife, and Wolfe “indicated that he had learned that al Qaeda in Syria was training brothers from other countries (foreign fighters) and then sending those fighters back from Syria to their home countries to conduct terror attacks,” the FBI says in court documents.

A month later, one of the FBI agents allegedly watched a YouTube video about foreign fighters in Syria with Wolfe and his wife.

They were planning to use some of their estimated $5,000 tax refund to pay for their travel, prosecutors say.

In subsequent meetings with undercover agents, Wolfe allegedly expressed dismay over infighting among terrorist groups in Syria, and he “struggled” with whether to actually go.

Then Tuesday, Wolfe and his family went to George Bush International Airport, attempting to board a flight to Toronto and then make their way to Syria.

Instead, Wolfe was arrested, accused of attempting to provide “material support and resources to terrorists, including but not limited to personnel, including himself.”

Khan became a US citizen in 2002 and is a full-time student at University of Texas-Austin, which is now on summer recess.

According to charging documents in his case, in early 2011, Khan began communicating with an informant in an online chat room, which he used “as a platform to spot and assess potential recruits for committing violent jihad overseas.”

Khan introduced the informant to an unidentified co-conspirator, possibly in Florida, who then attempted to recruit the informant to travel to Somalia to engage in jihad there, prosecutors say in court documents.

The co-conspirator then introduced the informant to another person, also likely in Florida, who discussed how Khan could get to Somalia to join the terrorist group al-Shabab.

In June 2011, Khan told the informant that his brain “starts bleeding” when he sees weak “bengalis” who have “no love for jihad” and “no love to shed blood,” authorities allege.

The arrests come a month after the Justice Department asked a special prosecutor in its National Security Division to help lead US efforts aimed at stemming the flow of American fighters to the civil war in Syria.

Top law enforcement officials have said they’re concerned the young men and women could possibly return home, freshly trained in deadly operations, and unleash havoc on the homeland.

– See more at: http://www.dhakatribune.com/bangladesh/2014/jun/19/bangladesh-born-american-arrested-terror-charges#sthash.NNW1IeQc.dpufVVV

Chaos After Court Order

13 vehicles burnt, 200 smashed

A minibus burns on Kazi Nazrul Islam Avenue at Karwan Bazar in the capital yesterday afternoon, hours after 33 top opposition leaders were sent to jail in an arson case.Photo: SK Enamul HaqStar Report

Agitated leaders and workers of BNP-led 18-party alliance vandalised around 200 vehicles and dozens of establishments across the country yesterday, ahead of today’s nationwide dawn-to-dusk hartal.

Scores were also injured in clashes between the alliance activists and law enforcers. The activists had blockaded roads and brought out processions protesting the court order that sent opposition leaders to jail.

A Dhaka court yesterday sent 33 leaders of 18-party alliance, including BNP acting secretary general Mirza Fakhrul Islam Alamgir, to jail rejecting their bail petition in a case filed in connection with torching a vehicle near the Prime Minister’s Office during April 29 shutdown.

Since yesterday afternoon, at least 13 vehicles were torched in Dhaka. Of them, four buses were set ablaze in Mirpur, one in Rajarbagh, one in Karwan Bazar, one on Panthapath, two pick-up trucks in Rampura, a taxi on Elephant Road and two buses and a car in Savar, on the outskirts of the capital.

Several people including pro-BNP lawyers and 18-party leaders and workers, and journalists sustained injuries in the capital when agitated activists clashed with law enforcers in and around the Chief Metropolitan Magistrate’s court.

In Thakurgaon town, BNP activists vandalised several banks and business establishments and at least 100 vehicles, including police vans, buses, microbuses, cars and motorbikes, reports our correspondent.

An hour after the violence, when police took position at Thakurgaon Chourasta (intersection), BNP activists engaged in a clash with the law enforcers. Twelve people, including three policemen, were injured in the clash.

Law enforcers had to lob 30 to 40 teargas canisters and shoot rubber bullets to calm the situation down, said Thakurgaon police.

The activists also snatched the camera of Partha Sarothi, district correspondent of Mohona Television, while he was shooting the violence.

Police arrested 11 people until 5:15pm, said acting superintendent of police Belayet Hossain.

In Chittagong, around 15 people, including three policemen, were injured when police shot rubber bullets at the activists of Liberal Democratic Party (LDP) and the party men retaliated. The protestors had blockaded the Chittagong-Cox’s Bazar Highway at Chandanaish upazila protesting the arrest of their leader Col (retd) Oli Ahmad.

They also vandalised at least six vehicles at different spots, said Chandanaish police.

In Sylhet, police used two teargas shells to disperse BNP and Swechchhasebak Dal activists when they brought out a procession in the city. However, they finally brought out a procession from Zindabazar area and marched the streets up to Chouhatta.

Witnesses said at least five vehicles were set ablaze in Zindabazar and adjacent areas.

In Sirajganj, 20 people, including a policeman and a journalist, were injured during clashes between police and BNP activists.

Witnesses said BNP activists vandalised two microbuses and two CNG-run auto rickshaws and some shops during a procession in Barobazar area. Police charged truncheons to disperse the agitators. They picked up 15 people from the spot.

In Pabna, Police detained BNP district unit joint secretary Shahidur Rahman Tutul Biswas from a procession.

In Dinajpur, Jatiyatabadi Jubo Dal and Chhatra Dal, pro-BNP youth and student bodies, clashed with law enforcers when police intercepted their procession at Nimtolarmore. Chase and counter chase took place. The activists finally reunited and brought out a procession.

BNP reels from prison shock

Rakib Hasnet Suman

The BNP, which had been threatening to launch tough anti-government movements, suddenly finds itself in deep trouble as a record number of senior leaders of the party and its associated bodies have been put behind bars in an arson case.

Leaders of all tiers of the party got “puzzled and panicky” when 33 top leaders of the BNP-led 18-party alliance, including BNP acting secretary general Mirza Fakhrul Islam Alamgir, were sent to jail yesterday.

Talking to The Daily Star, party insiders termed the incident “unprecedented” in the country’s political history and feared that the government’s “hard line” against the opposition may put democracy in jeopardy.

“There is no example of sending so many opposition leaders to jail in any democratic country in the world,” Khandaker Mahbub Hossain, an adviser to the BNP chairperson, told The Daily Star yesterday.

Khandaker Mahbub, also a former president of Supreme Court Bar Association, said he had witnessed the rule of Ayub Khan and Yahya Khan and also the last 40 years of independent Bangladesh, but never before did he see such mass detentions. “It did not happen even in any military rule.”

In February 2007, during the period of the military-backed caretaker government, 21 political leaders were sent to jail in a single day following an anti-corruption crackdown.

The BNP’s top and mid-level leaders said they could not believe that an opposition party’s acting secretary general could be sent to jail in a case over hartal violence.

They said the government had taken such action to hinder the country’s democracy.

Forty-five top leaders of the 18-party alliance are accused in a case filed for setting a bus ablaze near the Prime Minister’s Office during the April 29 hartal.

“The acting secretary general was at the [Nayapaltan] party office, which was cordoned off by police on April 29. So how can he be sent to jail in that case?” asked a BNP vice-chairman, requesting anonymity.

Mirza Fakhrul apart, those sent to jail yesterday include BNP standing committee members MK Anwar, Brig Gen (retd) ASM Hannan Shah, Mirza Abbas and Goyeshwar Chandra Roy, Joint Secretary General Aman Ullah Aman, central leader Ruhul Quddus Talukder Dulu, Fazlul Haque Milon, Shahiduddin Chowdhury Anee, Jatiyatabadi Chhatra Dal President Sultan Salauddin Tuku and its General Secretary Amirul Islam Khan Alim, Juba Dal President Syed Moazzem Hossain Alal and its General Secretary Saiful Alam Nirob, Swechchhasebak Dal President Habib un Nabi Sohel and its General Secretary Sarafat Ali Sofu.

Liberal Democratic Party President Col (retd) Oli Ahmed, Bangladesh Jatiya Party President Andaleeve Rahman Partha, Jagpa President Shafiul Alam Prodhan and NPP President Shawkat Hossain Nilu — all components of the 18-party alliance — were also sent to jail in connection with the arson case.

Referring to the wholesale lock-up, BNP standing committee member Lt Gen (retd) Mahbubur Rahman said it had created panic among party members but through this the government has ruined all possibility of talks with the opposition.

“But the BNP will overcome the crisis,” he told this correspondent last night.

Was the ruling obvious?

Staff Correspondent

Two reasons seemingly led to the rejection of bail prayers by 33 opposition leaders yesterday. However, doubters as always saw the government’s hand in the affairs of the lower courts.

The judge in this instance was left with little or no option regarding a grant of bail as the arson case was pushed to the speedy trial court and charges had already been pressed days before the leaders surrendered before the trial court yesterday at the instruction of a higher court.

When the accused surrender after a submission of the charge-sheet the court usually does not grant bail to them, which might have been the case with the opposition leaders, some legal experts told The Daily Star last night.

They also think the speedy trial law can be the other major reason behind sending the leaders into jail as the charges have been places under this act.

“Granting bail is an absolute discretion of the court,” barrister Tanjib-ul Alam told The Daily Star over telephone.

Tanjib said, “The fact that the charge sheet had already been submitted may have swayed discretion towards not granting bail.”

The case was filed against the leaders on April 29. The police submitted the charge sheet against them on May 10.

The court order also came in that line. While rejecting the bail, the metropolitan magistrate of the trial court said the charges brought against the accused were non-bailable and the investigation officer (IO) had already pressed charges against them, adding that the charges brought against them were preliminarily proved.

But despite the legal explanations, the country’s political culture of harassment of opponents has given enough reasons to cynics to cast doubts on court orders at times, a few legal bigwigs wishing not to be named said.

As per Speedy Trial Act, the trial has to be completed within 30 working days if all accused are in prison or on bail. But if any accused is absconding the trial has to be completed within 60 working days. The reason behind lingering the trial for fugitive accused is that some procedures take time in the case of fugitives, legal experts said.

If the detained BNP leaders now want to go to the higher court for bail, challenging yesterday’s magistrate court’s order of not granting bail, they have to go to Sessions’ Judges’ court; they cannot go to the High Court directly, they said.

The detained BNP leaders can go to the High Court for bail only after their bails are rejected by the Session Judges’ court, the experts said.

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